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NASA POSTED A MUSICAL REPRESENTATION OF THE BUTTERFLY NEBULA USING DATA SONIFICATION

This huge cloud of dust and gas in the Milky Way originates from either a dead star’s explosion or places where new stars are forming. They may mark the end of something…or a new beginning. But, have you ever pondered what these cosmic fairy dust forms sound like? NASA may have the solution.

A musical rendition of the Butterfly Nebula has been released on Instagram by NASA, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. It was made using a technique known as data sonification — the conversion of data into sound — and a variety of instruments to create the deep space sounding soundtrack.

In an Instagram post, NASA explained that each wavelength of light has been coupled with a distinct family of instruments to create a “symphony of calming sounds,” which can be heard panning from left to right. ‘The ‘wings’ of the butterfly are portrayed by strings and synthesized tones, while the stars are represented by an electronic harp.’

The Butterfly Nebula, commonly known as NGC 6302, is a luminous cluster and nebulae in the night sky of the planet Earth that may be seen from space. It was given this name because it resembles a fluttering butterfly, and it is around 2,500 to 3,800 light-years away from Earth. With a surface temperature of over 250,000°C, the dying central star of the Butterfly Nebula has likewise become extraordinarily hot, according to estimates. The Butterfly is glowing brilliantly in ultraviolet light, but it is obscured from direct vision by a dense torus of dust that has formed a pair of space cloud wings around the butterfly.

The close-up image NASA utilized for data sonification was taken in 2009 by the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, which was deployed on the final shuttle servicing mission and was captured by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009.

Despite the fact that the sound clip may not be completely close to what it would actually sound like in space, as NASA has stated, it simply gives us all the feels! Listen to the calming symphony emanating from beneath the surface.

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